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Monday, April 3, 2017

Susan Rice And Obama Unmasking Trump Associates





White House logs indicate Susan Rice consumed unmasked intel on Trump associatesby Sara Carter and John Solomon
Accountability

Watch |  Circa's Sara Carter reports on Susan Rice and her involvement in unmasking intel on Trump associates.
Computer logs that former President
 Obama’s team left behind in the White
 House indicate his national security
adviser Susan Rice accessed numerous
intelligence reports during Obama's last
 seven months in office that contained
 National Security Agency intercepts
involving Donald Trump and his
 associates, Circa has learned.
Intelligence sources said the logs
 discovered by National Security Council
 staff suggested Rice’s interest in the
NSA materials, some of which included
unmasked Americans' identities, appeared
to begin last July around the time Trump
 secured the GOP nomination and
accelerated after Trump’s election in
November launched a transition that
continued through January.3 of 13
The intelligence reports included some
 intercepts of Americans talking to foreigners
 and many more involving foreign leaders
 talking about the future president, his
 campaign associates or his transition, the
sources said. Most if not all had nothing to
 do with the Russian election interference
scandal, the sources said, speaking only
on condition of anonymity given the
sensitive nature of the materials.
Major US-Russia controversies from recent history
Ordinarily, such references to Americans
would be redacted or minimized by the
NSA before being shared with outside
 intelligence sources, but in these cases,
 names were sometimes unmasked at
the request of Rice or the intelligence
 reports were specific enough that the
American’s identity was easily ascertained,
 the sources said.

The exact national security justifications for
 Rice accessing the reports isn’t clear and
 may require additional documentation
that the House and Senate intelligence
committees have requested from the NSA,
America’s lead agency in spying on foreign
 powers.
How the information was disseminated
 beyond Rice will also be a potential focus
of congressional oversight, since lawmakers
 may want to know if it was briefed to
Obama or shared with members of her
 larger circle of advisers, like deputy
 Ben Rhodes.
Rice has not returned repeated calls for
comment from Circa. But in an interview
 with PBS recently, she said she had no
 idea what House Intelligence Committee
chairman Devin Nunes was talking about
 when he said Obama officials were
 monitoring Trump associates after the
 election.
One intelligence professional with detailed
 knowledge of how the NSA and other
 intelligence agencies share information
with the White House during transitions
 told Circa that U.S. intelligence reporting
on foreign leaders’ perceptions of Trump
spiked after his unexpected election win
 in November, creating a trove of information
 that could be accessed by the outgoing
White House.
“There’s always intelligence reporting on
 an incoming president and how the world
 is reacting but this election was not like
 others, and that reporting spiked,” the
source said. “Whether and how it was
 used by the Obama team will have to be
evaluated separate of the fact that the
 reporting this time around was richer and
more robust because of the circumstances
 of the election.”
Both the Republican chairman and
Democratic vice chairman of the Housing
 Intelligence Committee have been shown
 the documents discovered by the NSC
 over the last 10 days.
The NSA can legally intercept foreigners’
conversations without court permission
under Section 702 of the Foreign
Intelligence Surveillance Act, but it cannot
 target Americans’ conversations overseas.
 If an American is accidentally intercepted
 or two foreigners are caught talking about
an American, that name is supposed to be
 redacted in intelligence reports and
replaced by a description like “U.S.
citizen 1.”