Contact Form

Name

Email *

Message *

Sunday, January 29, 2017

Protests Nationwide And Detroit--Will They Do Anything? Only After There Is Another Terrorist Attack.By A Muslim!

Protests at DTW Airport, 

Across Metro Detroit 

Over Trump’s Executive 

Order on Immigrants, Refugees

Protesters fill international terminal, march in Muslim enclaves in

 Dearborn, Hamtramck to protest order.


Protests at DTW Airport, Across Metro Detroit Over Trump’s Executive Order on Immigrants, Refugees









DETROIT, MI — Protests erupted across Metro Detroit Sunday, 
two days after President Donald Trump’s executive order banning 
Muslims from certain countries from entering the country. The
 protests echoed numerous others this weekend at the country's
 international airports.
Hundreds demonstrated at Hamtramck, which is home to a
 number of American Muslims, and thousands more were at
 Detroit Metro Airport. Demonstrators marched in Dearborn, 
where about 40 percent of the city’s nearly 96,000 residents are 
Arab-American, and also gathered at Gerald R. Ford Airport in 
Grand Rapids and in Traverse City, according to media reports.
Trump’s order bans the issuance of visas and other immigration 
benefits to “nationals of particular concern” for 90 days, indefinitely 
suspends the Syrian refugee program and bans the resettlement of
 refugees from the affected countries for four months. The countries 
affected by the vetting measure have Muslim majorities, and include
 Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan Syria and Yemen.
The demonstrators also used the protests to decry Trump’s plans
 to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico.
At Detroit Metro Airport, protesters marched in the snow, carrying
 signs that read “No Ban, No Wall,” “Christians Supporting 
Muslims,” and “Resist!” while chanting loud enough to drown out
 jet engines. They congregated at McNamara Terminal, near the
 area for international arrivals and departures.
The protest was put together quickly Saturday evening by Phoebe
 Hopps, of Traverse City, who obtained a permit from Wayne 
County Airport Authority late Saturday night.
"Rooted in the promise of America’s call for huddled masses
 yearning to breathe free, we believe in immigrant and refugee 
rights regardless of status or country of origin,” Hopps told the 
Detroit Free Press. “We believe migration is a human right and
 that no human being is illegal. We stand with our Muslim sisters 
and brothers, and reject the path of xenophobia and extreme vetting.”
The protesters, who some estimates put at around 5,000, spanned
 generations.
Two brothers, ages 12 and 16, whose father emigrated from Yemen
 20 years ago carried homemade signs at the airport. The oldest,
 Amuarn Ahmed, said Trump’s order is causing “mayhem,” 
and punishes an entire group for the actions of a few, The Detroit
 News reported. Added his younger brother, Haroun: “It is against
 the Constitution. It doesn’t make sense.”
The protest at the airport broke up early Sunday evening, reportedly 
at the direction of the Department of Homeland Security.
Several Muslims assumed the prostrate position for prayer.
Get free real-time news alerts from the Farmington-Farmington Hills Patch.
SUBSCRIBE
Earlier Sunday at a protest in Hamtramck, the mayor of a Metro
 Detroit community known for its high population of gay residents, 
struck a chord of solidarity, The Detroit News reported.
“Gay or straight, black or white, Christian or Muslim, we stand 
with you,” Ferndale Mayor Dave Coulter, one of about a dozen 
speakers, said. “Power of the people is always stronger than the 
people in power.”
Abdual Al Ghazali, a Yemini-American who gained citizenship in 
2003, echoed Coulter’s words.
"This country, who built it? Immigrants and refugees. We love
 this country and we must stand together, doesn't matter (if you are) 
Muslim, Christian, Jewish, black, white. We must stand together 
for a better life," Al Ghazali said. "My kids have grown up here; 
this is all they know."

More on Patch


In Dearborn, Imam Mohammad Elahi, the leader of the Islamic
 House of Wisdom mosque in Dearborn Heights, said countries
 that are known for financing terrorism were not on the list, he
 said, referencing Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan and Pakistan, which
 have been linked to the 9/11 World Trade Center and Pentagon
 attacks.
“It is immoral and unbelievable that the president made this 
decision, targeting one of the fundamental parts of this nation's
 Constitution — religious liberty,” Elahi said.
Dearborn has the highest concentration of Arab-American residents
 of any U.S. city. About 40 percent of the city’s nearly 96,000 
residents are Arab-American, and the majority of them are
 practicing Muslims.
Unrelated to the protests, a West Bloomfield couple who had
 made a routine trip to Canada Friday were prohibited at the
 border from re-entering the United States. And detained for
 several hours before they were finally allowed to cross the border
 at the Port Huron-Sarnia crossing. Immigration attorney
 Farah Al-khersan is a U.S. citizen, and her husband, a permanent
 resident legally in the United States.
Al-khersan told the Detroit Free Press the the border agents who
 detained them were polite, but said the president’s order was not
 clear. “This is above our pay grade,” she said one of them told
 her. “It’s all so new.”
Here are more images from the protests from Twitter:
Photo by Hussein M. Dabajeh ‏used with permission